3 Reasons Why Studying Can Boost Your Mental Health

Study
Study

Studies show that deficiencies in mental well-being affect 792 million people all over the world, according to the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation. Covering over 10% of the global population, this confirms the need to address mental health issues in today’s society. As a result, institutions have discussed various measures that are needed to mitigate this issue and have agreed that mind stimulation is vital in promoting healthy mental well-being. But aside from the most common methods, such as following a healthy diet, getting enough sleep and daily exercise; Studying and learning new skills can also benefit your mental well-being. Here are three reasons why studying can help you achieve good mental health.

Fosters Self-Esteem and a Sense of Purpose

Our self-esteem can deteriorate through negative experiences. Meanwhile, healthy self-esteem is developed through positive experiences, such as the feeling of fulfilment at being good at something. Progressing through an academic track helps you to become better at your chosen field, thus generating the feeling of achievement throughout the process. For example, if your goal is to study psychology, becoming a Doctor of Psychology would be more fulfilling than settling on a bachelor’s degree. This sense of purpose is based on the knowledge that you are working towards achieving a greater goal, which you can continue building throughout your academic studies. Having a sense of purpose can be strengthened by forming connections with other lessons learned through continued studies. You can with them in ways that would not only strengthen your mind but also benefit the community.

Keeps the Mind Sharp and Ready

Sharp Mind
Sharp Mind

Our brains, like the rest of the body, weaken when not in use. To keep our minds sharp, your brain must actively form new neural connections. This is achieved by continued learning, according to Harvard Health Publishing. However, forming new neural connections and generating more brain cells doesn’t just involve academic studies. You can also keep your mind sharp by cultivating hobbies and learning new skills as well. Other ways to strengthen neural connections are finding new uses for skills that you already have or finding projects that combine your skills from different pursuits in social connections and creativity.

Helps Stave Off Mental Illness

Time and time again, studies have proven that continued learning can reduce age-related cognitive decline and boost your self-esteem. This applies to acute conditions such as the first onset of depression and anxiety. Not to mention, people who continue their studies are better able to deal with change in their lives and less likely to have dementia in old age.

Mental Health
Mental Health

Mental health has become an increasingly pressing issue around the world, but psychologists and behavioural scientists are working tirelessly to improve your global mental health and well-being. There are so many ways to learn new skills both inside and out of the classroom. You can learn a new language, engage in research, and continue your academic studies.